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In this episode of the Be Well, Do Well podcast, I sit down with Ara Wiseman, a renowned nutritional expert and aging well specialist from Toronto. Ara shares her incredible journey into nutrition, driven by her early aversion to meat and dairy and her intuitive belief that food is medicine. We delve into the benefits of a plant-based diet, discussing how it can enhance energy, improve mental clarity, and support overall health. Ara’s expertise shines through as she debunks common myths about protein and explains why leafy greens and nutrient-dense foods are essential for a healthy lifestyle.

Ara also opens up about her personal health challenges and how they inspired her to develop the Daily Greens supplement. She provides practical wellness tips for busy individuals, emphasizing the importance of hydration, proper nutrition, and self-care. We explore the mind-body connection and how nutrition can combat burnout and stress. Tune in to learn more about Ara’s favorite healthy recipes and her exciting new projects, including the upcoming anniversary edition of her book “Feed Your Body, Feed Your Soul.” This episode is packed with valuable insights for anyone looking to improve their well-being.

Transcript
Amin:

Hello and welcome back to the Be Well, Do Well podcast.

Amin:

Today I'm excited to have a conversation with our Wiseman.

Amin:

She's a leading nutritional expert and aging well specialist, and has worked with thousands of clients dealing with health challenges for over 20 years.

Amin:

Ara is based in Toronto, has written, published three books, feed Your Body, feed Your Soul, the Healing Option, and A Smoother You and Teaches Nutrition at the Transformational Arts College.

Amin:

Welcome to the show, ARA.

Ara W:

Thank you so much.

Ara W:

Thanks for having me.

Amin A:

So Ara, tell us a little bit about why you got into nutrition.

Ara:

So I grew up in Winnipeg in the seventies and back then, meat and dairy were essential for growing children.

Ara:

I never liked the taste of meat.

Ara:

I never liked dairy and would just kind of eat the potatoes and fruit.

Ara:

The sides, but I never liked the taste of that, and I never really liked the way it felt in my body.

Ara:

So back then I was considered a hippie or on the fringe because I was vegan.

Ara:

I ate differently and felt differently about food.

Ara:

So my brother would often jokingly say that I should go live on a commune.

Ara:

There weren't any health food stores back then.

Ara:

So I found like a bakery that had like super healthy bread and I would have like bread with banana sandwiches, toasted bread, banana sandwiches with honey and cinnamon and everything.

Ara:

And it was really nice and I kind of was very different back then, but I always inherently knew that food was medicine.

Ara:

And I remember back then too, my uncle, my elderly uncle who used to live with us, had gout.

Ara:

And gout back then was considered the rich man's disease because people couldn't afford meat.

Ara:

And meat is so heavily subsidized now, I.

Ara:

And I was able to help him, like I took the purines out of his diet and had him soak his feet in Epson salts and changed his diet, helped him with his gout, and just had a knack and an inherent ability to help people with their nutrition.

Ara:

I.

Ara:

I also remember too, watching family members dealing with like weight related health issues and struggling through different things and I always just knew that this was what I wanted to do and it just, like I said, it was just sort of innate.

Ara:

It was just something that came to me and I always knew that I was gonna do this for a living.

Amin:

Oh, that's amazing.

Amin:

I think your timing was perfect there because as you mentioned, you know, calling it vegan or vegetarian, and now it's referred to as plant-based.

Amin:

You see this everywhere.

Amin:

You see this in fast food restaurants.

Amin:

You see this on tv.

Amin:

There's so many things that are moving towards that.

Amin:

Plant-based lifestyle.

Amin:

I've even seen, funny enough, plant-based water, which made me laugh.

Amin:

Uh, gluten-free water, which made me laugh.

Amin:

And I don't know if the marketers were just playing with that and making it funny, but it's hilarious.

Amin:

you could tell us a little bit of why you think a plant-based diet is more healthy in general compared to a meat-based diet?

Ara:

So you want to eat food that is, is giving you something, not taking something from you.

Ara:

And the problem with meat is that meat primarily is fat per calorie.

Ara:

Doesn't have any fiber, doesn't have any, vitamin C is kind of lacking in nutrients.

Ara:

and to me.

Ara:

If you're eating more dark leafy greens and complex carbohydrates, you're getting a bigger bang for your buck.

Ara:

Meat really is hard on the system as well.

Ara:

It takes a lot of energy to digest it, and a lot of people eat too much of that, and then they end up having like their cholesterol gets higher, they have other issues.

Ara:

And the problem with that too is that most people are constipated and a lot of times.

Ara:

Like meat will putrefy, which is a horrible word, but it sits in the gut and it can cause a lot of damage.

Ara:

So meat is not a health food.

Ara:

Meat is more of a.

Ara:

I guess it's a taste that people have.

Ara:

I've never had that taste, so I don't know what that's like, but it's really, really not healthy for you in the sense that it's not giving you anything.

Ara:

It's actually taking from you.

Ara:

And I find a lot of people are really tired after, and my joke for that is on Thanksgiving when people are eating a lot of Turkey and turkey's high in tryptophan, so it would make sense.

Ara:

But I always picture somebody lying on the sofa with their pants undone, you know?

Ara:

Falling asleep and just being really fatigued from that meal because it's so much energy that your body needs to produce in order to metabolize, assimilate, and eliminate, you know that food?

Amin:

And I can definitely resonate with that because I'm vegetarian and I've been for more than 10 years now, probably about 15 years now.

Amin:

But I, I wasn't, before growing up, I used to eat meat every day.

Amin:

All three meals of my day consisted of some kind of meat, and majority of my plate was meat.

Amin:

Our kids have never had meat before, so they've been vegetarian since they were

Ara W:

Wow.

Amin:

not vegan.

Ara:

That's amazing.

Amin:

Yeah,

Amin:

and they don't have a taste for it.

Amin:

So sometimes we get, you know, a Beyond burger or something that simulated meat and they're like, nah, you know, doesn't do anything for me.

Amin:

But the question we get asked often, especially because it's not common amongst our circle for us to have kids that are vegetarian.

Amin:

I think we're the only ones that are vegetarian within our community.

Amin:

And people always say, well, why are you depriving them of protein?

Amin:

And that question makes me laugh and I, you know, I've done a little bit of research on that and I understand why, but what would you say to that when somebody says, well, where do you get your protein from as a, as somebody that has a primarily pet based diet?

Ara:

So I would say, where do you get your fiber from?

Ara:

To be quite honest with you and, and if you took a hundred calories of broccoli and you took a hundred calories of beef, chicken, or fish, the protein has more protein per calorie, whereas the beef, chicken, or fish has more fat per calorie.

Ara:

So even though meat has.

Ara:

Protein in it.

Ara:

The animals are getting the protein because they're eating the grass, hopefully, and not the grain, but they're eating grass and if they're grass fed and that's where they're getting their protein from.

Ara:

So it's a big misnomer that we need as much protein as we do.

Ara:

And when we think about aging well, which is something that I've, highly focused on, it's important to not.

Ara:

Put a lot of things in our body that cause a lot of stress, and to me, the meat causes a lot of stress, as I said earlier, but protein, you can get so much protein from so many foods, right?

Ara:

If you added up how much protein you're taking in during the day, as long as you're eating well, you're getting a lot of protein in everything.

Ara:

I mean, you could even get protein from the grass outside.

Ara:

Not that you would eat that, but you're getting a lot of protein in food.

Ara:

Protein isn't an issue.

Ara:

It's more.

Ara:

fiber, and it's more just eating well for your body in the stage that you're in.

Ara:

but that's, you know, your kids are much healthier as a result of the way that you're raising them because I really don't see any benefit to eating meat at all, you know, but I don't try and make my clients or the patients at the clinic.

Ara:

Vegan or plant-based, because I wouldn't have a practice if I did that.

Ara:

So what I do is I reduce the amount of animal protein that they're having to help them get healthier.

Ara:

And it's like an evolution, right?

Ara:

You know, we evolve into our food consciousness.

Ara:

We can't, you know, we can't just all of a sudden stop what we're doing because then we're unsure of what to have.

Ara:

So I do it very slowly with people, but I think that's wonderful that you're doing that.

Amin:

Yeah.

Amin:

Thank you.

Amin:

Thank you.

Amin:

watched a Netflix documentary, I think it was called Something Like You Are What You Eat.

Amin:

They took

Ara:

Yeah.

Ara:

Yeah.

Amin:

and they did a over, I don't know how long it was.

Amin:

There was 20 sets of twins and one twin would have a meat-based diet and one would have a vegetarian diet or vegan diet actually, and in the end they showed the difference and it was, I, I won't give it away, but it was actually stunning to see the end result of that.

Amin:

Something that I hear often is that.

Amin:

people say that they just don't like the taste of eating, you know, salads all day or having, you know, a, a breakfast shake in the morning or the green smoothies.

Amin:

Now, I know you have an interest in green smoothies, so tell us a little bit about the one that you developed, and how that came about.

Amin:

I.

Ara:

So I love healthy food and way back like, I guess it was in 2016, I got really ill from overworking and I was teaching at two colleges.

Ara:

I was working at a medical clinics.

Ara:

I was caring for my father in Vancouver.

Ara:

I was flying back and forth.

Ara:

Looking after him and he since passed away.

Ara:

I was moving my mother to Toronto.

Ara:

She fell, broke her arm, like my schedule was insane and there was so much going on and I ended up in bed like for quite a while after that, just recovering.

Ara:

And I just remember lying in bed thinking, okay, I need to put something really healthy in my body.

Ara:

And I am a researcher and I'm kind of like a bit of a fanatic.

Ara:

When I look at ingredients.

Ara:

I always tell my clients that I'm the bear of bad news because I will find something wrong with things.

Ara:

It's just what I do because I research everything.

Ara:

So I developed daily greens, daily greens.

Ara:

Is a product that is high in like fruit.

Ara:

It has like fruit powders in it.

Ara:

Um, it has spirulina, it has barley grass juice powder, it has spinach powder.

Ara:

I even put amla in it because amla is very nourishing and high in nutrients and antioxidants, such as allergic acid and it has a lot of nutrients and everything, and.

Ara:

What I needed and what I found is that I needed something to go really deep within my cells and to replenish what I lost through like the stress and like just everything that I was going through at that time.

Ara:

You know, I felt overwhelmed and exhausted.

Ara:

So I started formulating it and then once I kind of had samples of it, I started drinking it.

Ara:

And I have to say, and it's not just because it's my product, but I feel really good on it.

Ara:

I feel really healthy.

Ara:

I have really good responses from people as well.

Ara:

it tastes like Kool-Aid, and I know that sounds crazy 'cause Kool-Aid is not healthy,

Ara:

It has no stevia in it.

Ara:

It's just like a pure product of just literally fruit, papaya, wild blueberry and things like that.

Ara:

And some greens.

Ara:

So I'm actually drinking it right now.

Ara:

I tend to drink out of a mason jar.

Ara:

I, I hydrate a lot because I do find it really helps and, I'm always drinking my greens and I really feel healthy on

Amin:

That's amazing.

Ara:

I, I know it's a clean product.

Amin:

I've had it and it definitely does taste sweet and it's almost a bit of a shock to the system because you have a sip of it and you're expecting it to have like an algae taste or broccoli taste or something like that, but it has this very pleasant, sweet taste.

Amin A:

So definitely like that about it.

Amin A:

When it comes to burnout, how does the body mind connection work?

Amin A:

How does what you eat affect how you feel?

Amin A:

Because some people will say, well, burnout is just tired.

Amin A:

Get over it.

Amin A:

Have a coffee.

Amin A:

You know, do, do that.

Amin A:

But can you talk a little bit about the, the body mind connection from a nutrition standpoint?

Ara W:

So I look at it as we need to weather the storms that come our way and replenish what's lost through daily living.

Ara W:

You know, I've noticed that with myself as I've aged.

Ara W:

storms are gonna come our way, our parents.

Ara W:

are gonna pass at certain points and things are gonna happen, but we need to replenish what's lost through daily living.

Ara W:

And so for me it's about making sure that I've got all the nutrients that my body needs in order for my body to function really well.

Ara W:

a nutrient deficiency in itself is a stress, right?

Ara W:

So if you're low in B three or B six, or even folate, or even the mineral magnesium, what's gonna happen is that you're gonna feel maybe more depressed.

Ara W:

You're gonna, your mood is gonna be affected by that, and it's really important that we nourish ourselves with what we're doing.

Ara W:

We nourish ourselves with our self-care, self-care habits.

Ara W:

We nourish ourselves with all the things that we're doing by eating really well and looking after ourselves.

Ara W:

And there is a gut brain connection, and they say that your gut is like your second brain.

Ara W:

Because it's really important that we nourish ourselves and we keep our gut really healthy.

Ara W:

There's something called dysbiosis and auto detoxification.

Ara W:

So as I was saying, a lot of people are constipated because they're dehydrated.

Ara W:

They're eating foods that maybe aren't so good for them.

Ara W:

Anxiety can cause a lot of constipation as well, because when we're anxious.

Ara W:

We're contracting and we're holding onto something.

Ara W:

So it's really important to hydrate really well and to make sure that we're having like really good bowel movements every single day.

Ara W:

Because if we can keep our gut really healthy, there's reflex points inside your gut as well.

Ara W:

So if you're impacted on one side, it can affect another part of your body, right?

Ara W:

So it's really important that we look at what are we eating, what are we thinking?

Ara W:

What are we doing?

Ara W:

Are we in a good state?

Ara W:

Are we in a negative mindset?

Ara W:

And stress depletes us.

Ara W:

So stress is gonna kind of deplete us more of our nutrients because we're using more things to deal with that saber-tooth tiger that we're supposed to go fight or whatever is going on in your life.

Ara W:

So it's really important that we get enough nutrient density in our food.

Ara W:

Remember, our food is our medicine, and we need to make sure that what we're eating is chock full of nutrients and giving us something rather than taking something from us.

Amin A:

That's wonderful.

Amin A:

There's, great advice there.

Amin A:

We have a lot of listeners that are entrepreneurs.

Amin A:

parents, they have kids, they have, parents of their own.

Amin A:

And they're in that sandwich generation where they're just really busy

Amin A:

and they feel like they're stretched thin.

Amin A:

Now, what advice would you give for something.

Amin A:

Simple and easy.

Amin A:

Simple is not always easy, but something simple and easy that, that they can do to get started in this journey towards more wellness within their body and their mind.

Ara W:

So, I mean, I know it sounds really simple, but I will give you simple ideas.

Ara W:

Like you could hydrate better, you know, you could focus on proper hydration and adding, you know, not to, just, not, not just my product.

Ara W:

But adding some greens to it to get that extra bang for your buck.

Ara W:

You know, grasses are really good for us.

Ara W:

Um, I would also say eating lots of dark leafy greens, and I know that I'm kind of known for that, but it's eating like dark leafy greens.

Ara W:

They're so good for you.

Ara W:

They're high in folate.

Ara W:

Folate comes from the word foliage.

Ara W:

So when we're eating a lot of dark leafy greens, we're getting all that foliage, you know, that's really important, not overeating.

Ara W:

And you know, when you're at a meal and making sure that you're eating well and eating the right amount for your body.

Ara W:

But also the reason we tend to overeat is because the food that we're overeating is so calorie dense.

Ara W:

So I look at it as like, look at more nutrient dense foods, foods that have fiber and nutrients and, you know, a lot of really health nutrients inside our body that are gonna really help our body feel better

Ara W:

So it's making.

Ara W:

That energy count, like I always think if my body's gonna produce energy, I want it to count.

Ara W:

I wanna get something from that.

Ara W:

So sleeping really well is a big one too.

Ara W:

And I know that a lot of entrepreneurs and people in general have trouble sleeping.

Ara W:

So it's watching caffeine too, because a lot of times caffeine can have a 10 hour shelf life in your body.

Ara W:

So if you're drinking coffee late in the afternoon, you're a dehydrating yourself, and B, you're keeping yourself awake at night.

Ara W:

So.

Ara W:

I look at it like this.

Ara W:

So we have hormones that are in our body and we have cortisol that comes out of our adrenal glands.

Ara W:

And cortisol is like always the one that gets the most blame for things.

Ara W:

But we do need cortisol because cortisol gives us that get up and go in the morning where we're bounding outta bed, excited about our day, Supposedly, and then it's supposed to decline by three to five.

Ara W:

It kind of goes down and I always say I would like to instill that siesta that they have in Europe because it's a good time to kind of rest a little bit, hydrate really well, and then it's supposed to go down by 90% when we enter through the door at the end of our day.

Ara W:

The problem is though we've got emails, we've got work to do, we've got a lot going on, and as you said, families and sandwich generation.

Ara W:

I think the secret to success is nourishing.

Ara W:

Nourishing yourself while you're going through things.

Ara W:

And looking after yourself so that you don't come out the other end of it.

Ara W:

Worse for, you know, like in a, in a bad place.

Ara W:

And I remember when I was writing Feed Your Body, I remember going to like Montreal with my daughter because she was, she ended up at McGill, when she was a lot younger.

Ara W:

But I remember going there, we went to someone's house for dinner and the woman was in a really bad situation and I felt really bad for her.

Ara W:

But she was sitting at the end of the table drinking Coca-Cola and smoking cigarettes.

Ara W:

And I'm kind of like, you know, you're just digging yourself in deeper, like easier said than done.

Ara W:

I'm not in her shoes, I'm not going through what she went through.

Ara W:

But when my father was in the hospital, I took the stairs.

Ara W:

I had eye cream with me because every time I cried I'd want to not have wrinkles.

Ara W:

So I put eye cream on and I.

Ara W:

Ate really healthfully and I went and did things for myself.

Ara W:

I went to a yoga class.

Ara W:

I went shopping.

Ara W:

I went and got really healthy smoothies.

Ara W:

I did things to nourish myself, and I went and had acupuncture while I was going through all of that, so that I still came out the other end and I still had residue from it.

Ara W:

We're always gonna have that, but I was able to get back on track really easily because I didn't fall for so far off of it that I dug myself in deeper and.

Ara W:

You know, was, was worse for where afterwards, so to speak.

Amin A:

Yeah.

Amin A:

Yeah.

Amin A:

So I'm hearing, you know, a lot of small changes, small steps, you know, literally taking the stairs, right?

Amin A:

Small steps there.

Amin A:

Keeping a water bottle nearby.

Amin A:

So you're hydrated

Amin A:

now.

Ara W:

absolutely.

Amin A:

food is something that, you're passionate about as well with all the delicious looking recipes on your website.

Amin A:

do you think it makes sense to have a bigger breakfast and kind of taper down towards the end of the day, or do you have a smaller breakfast and have a bigger meal at the end of your day?

Amin A:

Which, which is your preference?

Ara W:

So I find like I see so many people, everyone's different.

Ara W:

Some people wake up in the morning and they're not hungry, and it could very well be, they're just not morning people and they're not hungry in the morning.

Ara W:

They like having their coffee.

Ara W:

I think that having a big glass of water with some greens in it, or just water with lemon is really a good way to start your day.

Ara W:

but some people don't eat breakfast and it could be that they're constipated and they've eaten so much the day before and they haven't had a proper bowel movement and therefore they're not hungry in the morning.

Ara W:

I would say, to answer your question, that I think lunch should be your bigger meal.

Ara W:

If you can, but then having that said as well, you know, if you're at work and you need energy and your food's a bit heavy, it may cause a bit of fatigue depending on your digestive system, depending on how much fat is in the meal.

Ara W:

So I think the answer to that would be going with who you are and what works best for you,

Ara W:

Consistency is really the key as well, because if people are skipping breakfast, they may, you know, be having more food later in the day just to kind of get the caloric intake that they need.

Ara W:

I really think it's more personal, but I do think that stopping to eat and letting your body fast from whether that's seven or eight or nine o'clock at night, depending on your schedule until the next day, is a really good opportunity.

Ara W:

To kind of fast a little bit, let your body process it will be better for your sleep.

Ara W:

You'll sleep more soundly, you'll have a better, it's, it's just so much healthier for you, but hydrating at the same time.

Amin A:

Okay, awesome.

Amin A:

I was gonna ask about,

Amin A:

uh, intermittent fasting.

Amin A:

What, what are your thoughts on that?

Ara W:

So I think intermittent fasting is good if you are not stressed, because when you're stressed, your body's gonna pump out adrenaline.

Ara W:

And adrenaline is really harsh and cor, like it's corrosive in your body, right?

Ara W:

So I think it depends again on your stress level.

Ara W:

I think it depends on your toxicity level because if you have a lot of toxins stored in your fatty tissue and your fasting, they could come out and cause a headache.

Ara W:

I also don't agree with having coffee and I.

Ara W:

Sort of intermittent fasting, but as I tell my students, don't take away someone's coffee experience because they're never gonna come back.

Ara W:

So I think having your coffee in the morning, if that's your thing and it, you really look forward to it and it's part of your day.

Ara W:

Fine, but, make sure you hydrate as well.

Ara W:

But I think intermittent fasting can be very helpful.

Ara W:

and there's different ways to do it, right?

Ara W:

You could start off by maybe having that fast from like seven or eight o'clock at night until the next day, you know, whatever works for you.

Ara W:

You could also maybe have two meals a day.

Ara W:

But again, if you're really stressed and you're in a high stress situation or you're going through something, I think smaller meals more often is helpful, to keep the adrenaline from coursing through your body and causing damage.

Ara W:

Right.

Ara W:

We're gonna run on something I'd rather run on nutrients.

Ara W:

Yeah.

Ara W:

it's just from my experience, right, because like I said, I see so many people and everyone has a unique way of.

Ara W:

You know, their lifestyle.

Ara W:

Um, you know, just there's so many factors that, you know, are really real for people.

Ara W:

So, yeah.

Amin A:

great.

Amin A:

That's great.

Amin A:

I like your approach because it's flexible.

Amin A:

It's not rigid.

Amin A:

It's not fixed in one way where you have to have a big breakfast and no dinner or intermittent fasting.

Amin A:

So speaking of dinner, do you have a favorite recipe or a favorite dish that you like to have for dinner?

Ara W:

So I've been obsessing over steamed broccoli right now.

Ara W:

I don't know why, like, my body's just craving it.

Ara W:

I made a really healthy vegetable soup yesterday, like with, I'm really into celery root too.

Ara W:

I buy celery root and it, it has such a nice flavor, so I put that into my soup.

Ara W:

I made a delicious vegetable soup yesterday.

Ara W:

Um, I would say I like buckwheat SOA noodles.

Ara W:

I like, um, I like having like a lot of dark leafy greens and I know I say that often, I really feel good on that.

Ara W:

And salad may not be the only way.

Ara W:

Like another way to do that is to make your dinner.

Ara W:

Whatever that is.

Ara W:

And throw a handful of organic baby spinach washed at the bottom of your bowl and then throw your dinner on top of it, and then at least you're getting some greens in it.

Ara W:

Or add some dark leafy greens to your meal, like if you're making a stew or something like that.

Ara W:

but I love, like I'm obsessing over broccoli right now.

Ara W:

I have no idea why.

Ara W:

But I've just been eating a lot of that.

Ara W:

but again, like tonight, for instance, I'm gonna make buckwheat soa noodles with, you know, some steamed broccoli and some peas, and a really nice sauce with it.

Ara W:

it's become one of our favorites, so I'm probably gonna have that tonight.

Ara W:

and then I also love having, you know, lots of water and I make really healthy teas in the evening as

Amin A:

Okay.

Amin A:

Okay.

Amin A:

That sounds wonderful.

Amin A:

Funny thing about broccoli is,

Amin A:

I remember when I was starting the journey into becoming vegetarian or having a plant-based diet, and I would mostly eat, Vegetarian food and then occasionally, like once a week, once every other week, once a month I would just go and have a burger or something.

Amin A:

Something meat.

Amin A:

I remember this specifically.

Amin A:

I was at a wedding, and at a wedding they had this long line of, a buffet where they have the roast beef at the very end.

Amin A:

And right before the roast beef, they had all the vegetarian stuff.

Amin A:

And so I was going through and I could see the roast beef, I could smell it, and I was like, oh, that smells really good.

Amin A:

But then they had this big, you know, container of steamed broccoli and it looked really good.

Amin A:

And I remember looking back and forth between the broccoli and the, and the roast beef and thinking, I actually prefer to have the broccoli today.

Amin A:

And that was the point at which it.

Amin A:

There was really no turning back after that.

Amin A:

I was like, okay, you know, I don't really need the roast beef even though it looks delicious.

Amin A:

It smells delicious.

Amin A:

I don't really need it, but the broccoli just looks so good and I remember, thinking, okay, this is it.

Amin A:

I'm vegetarian now.

Amin A:

Yeah.

Ara W:

wonderful to hear that though, because it does take people quite a while to, you know, especially if you're used to that smell, like if that smell appeals to you, like I don't have that taste or smell for it because I never liked it.

Ara W:

So I get it though, and I feel like that's a really good pivotal point for you where you just realized at that point you don't need to have the roast beef.

Ara W:

You are gonna feel so much healthier from the broccoli and it's gonna be lighter for you too.

Ara W:

Like you're gonna walk away from that meal without that heaviness and yeah, 'cause meat is quite heavy, right?

Ara W:

And unfortunately, you know, meat, like the way that they produce it now is very unhealthy.

Ara W:

For the animals specifically, but also what they're injecting them with.

Ara W:

Like, it's a horrible thing.

Ara W:

So I kind of feel like if less people ate it, then those poor animals could, you know, 'cause they're sentient beings and they feel pain.

Ara W:

Like they know when their friends are being slaughtered.

Ara W:

And I don't know, I just, I'm very empathic so I can actually feel the pain.

Ara W:

And, and that's, I find it very difficult,

Amin A:

Right.

Amin A:

Yeah.

Amin A:

that.

Amin A:

Netflix show, the Netflix show I mentioned earlier, they definitely talk a lot about that.

Amin A:

And just getting back to your comment about feeling better when I'm, I remember when I did have a week or two or three or four of just plant-based diet, no meat at all, and that that was the beginning of entirely no meat.

Amin A:

I remember I was sleeping.

Amin A:

Less, but I felt more rested.

Amin A:

I had more

Amin A:

mental clarity.

Amin A:

And those were the two things that surprised me a little bit.

Amin A:

I knew that that was a side effect, but just not how much I would feel it.

Amin A:

I remember getting up in the morning and being wide awake and not feeling groggy, not having to like pull myself outta bed.

Amin A:

And I also remember being able to think a lot more clearly.

Amin A:

and that was the beginning of my entrepreneurial journey as well.

Amin A:

And so having those two connected together where I had more time, more energy was, it was almost like a magic pill.

Amin A:

Right?

Amin A:

That was great.

Ara W:

Yeah, and I do believe too, and I don't know, there's no scientific proof for this, so I don't mention this to too many people, but I feel like we pick up the adrenaline that the animal feels before they're slaughtered.

Ara W:

Like again, I have no scientific proof.

Ara W:

I'm not gonna, I.

Ara W:

Put that in a book or something like that.

Ara W:

But I just really feel that, you know, we're taking on like I feel like animal protein makes you very aggressive.

Ara W:

And I remember when I was teaching one of my courses, and I tell all the patients at the clinic this, that animals revenge from the grave is cholesterol because they leave a little bit of themselves inside you every time.

Ara W:

And it's very true, like.

Ara W:

People get really sick from eating that.

Ara W:

And I think it's because, again, there's no fiber, there's no vitamin C, there's no nutrients, there's growth hormone, there's, you know, it's not a healthy approach.

Ara W:

Like it's not giving you anything.

Ara W:

It's taking from you and it's taking a lot of energy and I feel like.

Ara W:

Oftentimes what happens to some patients, not all of them, but most of them, is that once they kind of, I always say it's the point of no return.

Ara W:

They will all of a sudden think, okay, I feel like a burger.

Ara W:

And they eat a burger and they feel awful after, and they come back to see me and they're like, you know, I thought I really wanted it.

Ara W:

I had it.

Ara W:

I felt horrible afterwards.

Ara W:

And I'm like, congratulations.

Ara W:

'cause now you're at that point of no return where you know it's not good for you and.

Ara W:

You could feel it.

Ara W:

Your body's kind of basically saying that it's, it's not healthy.

Ara W:

You do have more clarity though, like I do find fasting, but you can fast with food, like you can do different cleanses and things like that,

Ara W:

It increases your spiritual awareness and it does give you a lot more clarity and it does give you a calm, like a sense of calm.

Ara W:

I can't explain it, but it is really nice when you kind of lighten your load a little bit and eat right for your body, but allow your body those times where.

Ara W:

It doesn't have to focus on digestion all the time, but again, fasting or cleansing with food for where you're at, not, it's not for everybody.

Ara W:

And it's, it doesn't have to be like an aggressive approach.

Ara W:

It can be a very gentle approach where you just kind of have one day per week where maybe you're having fruit in the morning for the morning, and then maybe at lunchtime you have like a really healthy vegetable soup.

Ara W:

and that's like a good way to start, you know?

Ara W:

And then you're not really Eating things that are causing your body to have a lot of stress, energy wise.

Ara W:

And you can kind of just start doing it that way so that if you do get a headache or if you do start to feel unwell, you could always go back to eating something healthfully that will kind of stop that process from happening, that catabolic process in your body.

Ara W:

Because oftentimes people have so many toxins in their fatty tissue, and you have to do things properly.

Ara W:

Like you can't just all of a sudden suggest to somebody that they fast, because that may not be right for them at the stage that they're in.

Ara W:

And it's just learning how to, navigate your body and understand what your body's trying to tell you.

Ara W:

And when you clear away all that clutter.

Ara W:

You.

Ara W:

You can hear what your body's saying

Ara W:

and it kind of gives you messages.

Ara W:

Right.

Ara W:

But it's hard to get to that point when you're always stuffing something in it.

Amin A:

that's right.

Amin A:

So, one question I like to end this conversation with is what's got you excited right now?

Amin A:

What are you working on that just has you fired up and excited?

Amin A:

Like you said, you jump outta bed, right?

Amin A:

So what, what is it that gets you out of bed?

Amin A:

I.

Ara W:

So I feel really blessed to be doing what I'm doing.

Ara W:

I feel like I've always wanted to be in the helping profession and I feel that I'm able to help people, which makes me feel really good and, obviously them as well.

Ara W:

I'm rewriting Feed Your Body, feed Your Soul.

Ara W:

It's gonna be a 10th anniversary edition and I'm actually looking for a literary agent right now.

Ara W:

I wanna get this one published.

Ara W:

I self-published my other books.

Ara W:

that's really exciting for me.

Ara W:

I also have four more products that I'm formulating.

Ara W:

One of them is already At the lab and I have three more.

Ara W:

So by the end of this year, I hope to have, another four products.

Ara W:

On my, our essentials.

Ara W:

So I'm really excited about that.

Ara W:

I love doing it.

Ara W:

It's my way to be creative and, and writing too.

Ara W:

Writing is my passion.

Ara W:

So I think having the opportunity to rewrite my book, like, and just expanding certain chapters on it, especially aging well and you know, and just.

Ara W:

Focusing on things like that.

Ara W:

I am getting up in my age as well, which is a real blessing and I see it as a privilege.

Ara W:

I'm definitely close to the end of my fifties, so aging well is something that I'm very focused on from the inside out and looking after ourselves and, and yeah, and it's, it's all, you know, really amazing.

Ara W:

And I just wanna say one thing.

Ara W:

I was thinking about my uncle when I was thinking about the gout and my uncle said something really.

Ara W:

Wise when I was younger and he said if we put all of our problems in the middle of the table, we'd end up taking ours back because our problems are there to teach us something, right?

Ara W:

We need to learn from the things that we're struggling through.

Ara W:

And it's just something that's always kind of resonated with me because I always think that, you know, we always think that our problems are the worst but they're ours for a reason.

Ara W:

You know, there's something very.

Ara W:

Powerful that we need to learn from

Amin A:

Absolutely.

Ara W:

So

Amin A:

Well, we'll definitely put the links to your website and to the Daily Greens website as well in the show notes.

Amin A:

But if somebody wanted to get ahold of you and connect with you, how can they do that?

Ara W:

So they can go onto my website or they can send me an email at info@rwiseman.com, I'm always getting back to people quickly because I know that oftentimes there's an urgency with health and, and I wanna be there to help people.

Ara W:

So, yeah, so I'm, I'm, that's the best way and, and my website of course.

Amin A:

Awesome.

Amin A:

Well, thank you so much, Ari.

Amin A:

I really appreciate your time today and your energy, and your wisdom.

Amin A:

It's been really nice chatting with you and I'm really looking forward to, seeing the other three products that you have on the go.

Ara W:

Thank you so much.

Ara W:

Yeah, I'm excited about that too,

Amin A:

Thanks again.

Ara W:

so thank you.