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Joe Templin is a human Kaizen expert. We had an amazing conversation about how to stay productive, building small success habits, and how our thoughts influence our environment.

There’s so much gold packed away in this episode!

Transcript
Amin Ahmed:

Hello and welcome back to the Be Well, Do Well podcast.

Amin Ahmed:

I'm excited today to have another conversation with a fascinating entrepreneur.

Amin Ahmed:

Joe Templin is a human Kaizen expert and is on a mission to influence a hundred million people to be better.

Amin Ahmed:

Wow.

Amin Ahmed:

I'm excited to be part of his journey.

Amin Ahmed:

Welcome to the show, Joe.

Joe Templin:

Thank you Amin.

Joe Templin:

And having a B-HAG, what Jim Collins called in the book, "Good to Great".

Joe Templin:

A big hairy audacious goal.

Joe Templin:

Something that huge is one of the things that can really motivate us because when we're trying to build something, We often get caught in the grind and it beats us down, especially if we're not making a lot of progress or, there's a coading error that delays things for a week, which we've all had happen.

Joe Templin:

Or a provider goes out business or what have you with these disruptions, and we can get really frustrated.

Joe Templin:

But if we have our eyes on this mission as so much bigger than us, then it draws us and we figure out a way.

Joe Templin:

As the great general Hannibal, not from the A Team, the original General Hannibal said, I will find a way or make away.

Joe Templin:

And that's one of the things about the entrepreneurial journey is very much what Nche said.

Joe Templin:

If a man has a strong enough why, he'll be able to overcome any how.

Joe Templin:

And there are all sorts of, impediments on the journey.

Amin Ahmed:

Yeah.

Amin Ahmed:

Yeah.

Amin Ahmed:

That's fascinating.

And the idea of BHAG:

big, hairy, audacious goal, there's so many things we can go within that

And the idea of BHAG:

but before we jump into the details of bhag, which I really wanna talk about,

And the idea of BHAG:

Tell us what a human Kaizen expert is.

Joe Templin:

Okay, so most people who are in manufacturing or engineering are familiar with the term Kaizen.

Joe Templin:

Kaizen is the Japanese concept of continuous improvement, and it was really implemented post World War II when everything was bombed out and they couldn't get new machinery.

Joe Templin:

They had to get two decade old machinery.

Joe Templin:

So they had to figure out how to do the best with what they.

Joe Templin:

And trying to squeeze more out of it.

Joe Templin:

And when Toyota came to the United States shores in the late sixties, early seventies, their cars were absolute dog crap.

Joe Templin:

They were the worst pos's out there.

Joe Templin:

Horrible quality.

Joe Templin:

they broke down constantly.

Joe Templin:

They were not really sexy looking or anything, but they also imported.

The concept of kaizen:

of this continuous improvement were anybody, whether it was the person sweeping the floors or the CEO or an individual on the line could make a micro change and do literally almost like an AV test from the computer world to see, Hey, can we get a little bit better with this?

The concept of kaizen:

And by adopting that mindset, they were able to create these very short feedback loops where they were getting continuous improvement.

The concept of kaizen:And by the:The concept of kaizen:

So the concept of Kaizen was then adopted by every single manufacturer, whether it was Westinghouse, general Electric, the big three automakers, everybody was using this.

The concept of kaizen:

And then those grow over to software, really in the concept of lead manufac, lean, but we've never applied it to the most important resource in the organization, which is the human being . And so we've got all these different components of our life, physical health, our

The concept of kaizen:

Life's chaotic.

The concept of kaizen:

when you have kids, when you have aging parents, when you have business, all this stuff's going on and so things slip through the cracks.

The concept of kaizen:

We don't pay attention to stuff cause our focus is more on the business than our health this month, or sick kids.

The concept of kaizen:

So work takes a back seat for a couple of days and.

The concept of kaizen:

We, if we can apply a little bit more focus to these different areas, we can start getting some incremental gains.

The concept of kaizen:

And if you have tiny little improvements, even if they're almost negligible, They compound in the app and that's part of the reason for the cover of the book.

The concept of kaizen:

I've got this really cool logarithmic growth curve.

The concept of kaizen:

You can't see the little bumps up and down all along it, but you can see the long range trend, which is if you can get 1% better per day at the end of your year, you're 37 times better.

The concept of kaizen:

that's probably unsustainable cause there's a lot more hanging food.

The concept of kaizen:

If you can get 1% better per week, at the end of two years, you're three times as good.

The concept of kaizen:

So we can all squeeze on out and have this continuous improvement or this human kaizen and ultimately end up in a much better place by making tiny better choices.

Amin Ahmed:

Oh, that's amazing.

Amin Ahmed:

the title of your book is called Everyday Excellence.

Amin Ahmed:

Yes.

Amin Ahmed:

. So I like that idea a lot because every single day, like you said, you can't do everything.

Amin Ahmed:

And I've said this over and over again is that I don't believe work life balance exists, but you can be well and you can do well.

Amin Ahmed:

If you're focused on the be well side of it first, then the do happens, naturally without as much effort.

Amin Ahmed:

It doesn't happen automatically, but without effort.

Joe Templin:

And it's one of those things like the, in the airplane, if the mask comes on down, you like take care of yourself before taking care of.

Joe Templin:

As my, friend in right arm, basically Athena reminds me I'm no good to anyone if I'm broken.

Joe Templin:

Yeah.

Joe Templin:

So I need to.

Joe Templin:

Remember, all right, I actually need to sleep occasionally.

Joe Templin:

I need to make sure that I'm eating well.

Joe Templin:

if I'm getting stressed out, I need to go for a run if my ankle can hold up cause it's messed up again.

Joe Templin:

so taking that little bit of me time, people are like, oh, I can't do that.

Joe Templin:

If you take a 15 minute power nap in the early afternoon and get up in your twice as product, Then within 15 minutes you've made up that lost time and at the end of an hour you're actually well ahead of the curve.

Joe Templin:

So taking the moment to step back and reevaluate and invest in what you need to is basically a little bit of a J curve where you're, yeah, you slow down a little bit so that you can go faster and harder.

Amin Ahmed:

and how do you make these little elements of excellence in your day?

Amin Ahmed:

How do you make those into a habit.

Joe Templin:

So habits, one way of getting 'em is to create a habit stack like James Clear talks about.

Joe Templin:

So we all get up in there, right?

Joe Templin:

You wake up, you get outta bed.

Joe Templin:

So that is the most critical time in the day because it sets the mood for everything.

Joe Templin:

And typically when we're getting up, there's less chaos than there is in the middle of the.

Joe Templin:

Kids aren't up, the phone's not ringing, you don't have to deal with all sorts of things.

Joe Templin:

So that first half hour to an hour is the golden time.

Joe Templin:

That is when you can be the most productive and you can literally set the backdrop for the entire day.

Joe Templin:

So I get up, I brain dump anything that was in my head.

Joe Templin:

I read for a couple of minutes every single morning.

Joe Templin:

I then I go and I work.

Joe Templin:

Because working out in the morning will help rush stuff outta your system.

Joe Templin:

You've literally been laying down for five hours, six hours, eight hours, however long you sleep.

Joe Templin:

And so your brain is, even though you've been producing theta waves, when you've been passing it out asleep, you process stuff, you need to basically wake it back up and engage it.

Joe Templin:

So exercise is one of the best ways to do that.

Joe Templin:

if you look at an EEG of somebody after they exercise the whole thing, absolutely awesome, and there's a reason why Sir Richard Branson says that the number one productivity tool is exercise.

Joe Templin:

So you go work out for 20 ish minutes to everything lit up.

Joe Templin:

Then I sit down and I write, I do some of my social media type stuff.

Joe Templin:

Then I go and I work out again.

Joe Templin:

For another half hour because I'm a endurance athlete.

Joe Templin:

And then I'll write some more, and then I'll get ready for the rest of my day.

Joe Templin:

So I get up typically at four 30 by six o'clock in the morning.

Joe Templin:

I've already accomplished more than most people during the day, and then when I'm rolling into the office, it's like boom, I'm already ahead of the curve.

Joe Templin:

So instead of me playing catch up and trying to catch other people, I'm the lead and people are trying to catch up to me, and so it puts you in a very different state.

Joe Templin:

You can achieve the state of flow much easier simply because the stress level's down, because you already know that you would accomplish more than what most people have, and it just pushes you to go further and harder.

Amin Ahmed:

I wake up at four, between four and four 30 as well.

Amin Ahmed:

and you're totally right that when it gets to about six o'clock, seven o'clock, you've already accomplished so much compared to, an average person going into a day job that doesn't enjoy what they do.

Joe Templin:

if you've got kids, then the kids are getting up and you're getting 'em ready for school and there's stuff all over the place.

Joe Templin:

if that's how you started your day, you'd be all upset because there's milk all over.

Joe Templin:

the table at this point.

Joe Templin:

But if you've already knocked off a bunch of good stuff, you've gotten that workout workouts actually reduce your stress levels and so you're able to handle the chaos much better.

Amin Ahmed:

Yeah.

Amin Ahmed:

Yeah.

Amin Ahmed:

true cuz you're not getting rid of the chaos, you're handling it, you're managing that chaos.

Joe Templin:

You're riding the wave essentially.

Joe Templin:

. Amin Ahmed: Yeah.

I've got my, I call it my MIP:

most important block, 90 minutes in the morning where I do something sometimes and I'm just looking for some feedback from you.

I've got my, I call it my MIP:

Sometimes I get stuck in the how versus the why, and at the end of that 90 minutes, I realize I was working on something that probably I could have outsourced to somebody else, my team members or virtual assistant.

I've got my, I call it my MIP:

and I shouldn't have been doing it, but it's sometimes so fun to do.

I've got my, I call it my MIP:

before we started recording, we were talking about how you and I are both geeks in that sense, like technology.

I've got my, I call it my MIP:

So sometimes it gets stuck in doing these things that I enjoy doing, but I know I shouldn't be doing cuz I should be focusing on the why.

Joe Templin:

And that's actually the hardest part is when you actually enjoy it.

Joe Templin:

Yeah.

Joe Templin:

But it's not the highest and best use of your.

Joe Templin:

When somebody else can do it, 95% as well, or even 90% as well, they should be doing it.

Joe Templin:

I am telling everybody that I work with say no more often because focus is saying no to things that you can be good at so that you can have the additional bandwidth to be exceptional at certain things.

Joe Templin:

So I did the Warren Buffet exercise, it's where you sit down, you write the 25 most important things that you really wanna accomplish, and then you need to go through and choose the top five and all the others you need to get off your plate because they are just interesting enough or exciting enough or fun enough to distract you.

Joe Templin:

And the good is the enemy of the great.

Joe Templin:

And you can be good at those.

Joe Templin:

But it's not gonna be great.

Joe Templin:

So I've got a saying, one minute planning prevents an hour worth of work before I start my day.

Joe Templin:

Like I'll take care of that basic, writing and some social media stuff cause that needs to be done every day.

Joe Templin:

But before I jump into the real day, I look at the schedule for that day, the coming week, and anything that's up and coming.

Joe Templin:

To see what's most important, and then I will take a couple of minutes and I will write down on an index card.

Joe Templin:

This is how I manage my day, actually, for the most part, not my big projects, but my day.

Joe Templin:

I write down the three to five most important things that I need to get done that day.

Joe Templin:

And it might be like, write this proposal.

Joe Templin:

It might be follow up with this individual.

Joe Templin:

It might be, write one thing . So whatever it is, and as I'm going through 'em, I cross off and then I go and David Larner throw it in the corner.

Joe Templin:

But it allows me to be making sure that I'm not just busy, I'm productive, I'm focused on the right things.

Joe Templin:

And once I get through that list, technically I have achieved everything that I'm supposed to that day I'm in the bonus round.

Joe Templin:

And so if depending on when, during the day it is, I will take the time and reevaluate.

Joe Templin:

Okay, what are the next.

Joe Templin:

And by doing this, do you get everything done?

Joe Templin:

No.

Joe Templin:

I mean like my house is a mess at times and stuff like that.

Joe Templin:

But I'm getting the most important things done and I'm always looking with the Tim Ferris idea, my word for the year, cause I chose a word for the year, is deal.

Joe Templin:

Just cuz I need to deal with all sorts of chaos and all that.

ut and where I work with DEAL:

delegate, eliminate, automate, locations.

ut and where I work with DEAL:

Delegate, okay?

ut and where I work with DEAL:

I've turned things over to people in my organization.

ut and where I work with DEAL:

I've hired outside people to take care of it.

ut and where I work with DEAL:

Cuz even if I have to pay somebody, a thousand dollars a month to do something, but frees up 30 hours of my time, that is completely worth it.

ut and where I work with DEAL:

Okay.

ut and where I work with DEAL:

Delegate, eliminate, do I need to be doing this?

ut and where I work with DEAL:

Do I need buffet exercise that I talk about?

ut and where I work with DEAL:

Automate?

ut and where I work with DEAL:

Okay.

ut and where I work with DEAL:

My one coaching program where people get an email every single day that's built out to be completely automated.

ut and where I work with DEAL:

I had to create what is sent, but I don't need to sit there and, type out a hundred emails every single day.

ut and where I work with DEAL:

If you send this thing out, it's built out.

ut and where I work with DEAL:

So again, a J curve there, take a couple hours to build out the system.

ut and where I work with DEAL:

That then saves you a half hour every single day.

ut and where I work with DEAL:

That's a tremendous savings of time.

Amin Ahmed:

And L for location, what is that?

Joe Templin:

So location like it for Tim Ferris.

Joe Templin:

It's be able to go and run your business from anywhere that you want.

Joe Templin:

And so like I've got a good friend, Ed Stern from Commit Club who we're doing some work together on things and I talked to him yesterday and the first question on my mouth is, where are you today?

Joe Templin:

because months ago he was in Bucharest, Romania, and then he was in Rome, and I think now he's in Spain.

Joe Templin:

So he can do that.

Joe Templin:

He's single, no kids and all that.

Joe Templin:

I can't do that.

Joe Templin:

My location being able to do things is to be able to respond to an email on a boy Scouts weekend or when I'm at the lake house for the weekend, be able to respond cuz I've got the constraints of.

Joe Templin:

Aging parent kids in, junior high and high school and these other things.

Joe Templin:

So to me, I don't wanna go and be staying, in Europe someplace to be responding because quite frankly, the needs of my kids, my family are greater at this point down the road, yeah, I can be completely bohemian.

Joe Templin:

But if you do the first three, the delegate, the eliminate, and the automate, then you can choose your location.

Joe Templin:

Right now my location happens to be my office because know what, I have no problem with it.

Amin Ahmed:

in the beginning we talked a little bit about B-HAG, big hairy, audacious goal.

Amin Ahmed:

your book, is it fair to say, was a B-HAG at some point for you?

Joe Templin:

actually it wasn't because, when I look at B-HAG, that's something that's gonna take years to accomplish potentially.

Joe Templin:

so like building a media empire, get my hundred million mission, things like that.

Joe Templin:

So that's where you're gonna have to make all sorts of changes.

Joe Templin:

You're gonna have to bring in resources that you don't have.

Joe Templin:

You're gonna have to change your thinking.

Joe Templin:

All that.

Joe Templin:

Writing my book, the way that I got the idea for, I was, literally down in my weight room tossing around at Kyle Bell, listening to Jocko Willik talk and listening to some Black Sabbath on the other thing.

Joe Templin:

Cause I multitask like that.

Joe Templin:

and Jocko made a comment that, excellence is a habit.

Joe Templin:

I'm like, oh, habits need to be practiced every single day.

Joe Templin:

I stopped mid swing.

Joe Templin:

Everyday excellence.

Joe Templin:

And I had the story moment of the vision.

Joe Templin:

I put down the bell, ran upstairs, brain dumped out, for about 15 minutes how I saw the book, playing out with a quote, discussion and analysis around it, and then an action for every single day of the year, and then intro after all that sort of stuff.

Joe Templin:

Then went back down and fished my workout.

Joe Templin:

But since I had this vision, I'm like, What do I need to do in using a habit stack from James Clear, every single morning after I did my brain dump, I'd do my first workout.

Joe Templin:

I would sit down and I would write two days of the book.

Joe Templin:

So I'd write January 27th and January 28th.

Joe Templin:

Then I'd go do my own workout.

Joe Templin:

And so it wasn't a BHAG in that it was this monster life-changing type thing, like running my ultramarathons war gang mc or whatever championship or anything like that.

Joe Templin:

It was more like, okay, this is a process.

Joe Templin:

This is something I just have to sit down and do this every single day and I'll get through it in a reasonable time.

Joe Templin:

And that's how I was able to write a 700 plus page book in six months.

Amin Ahmed:

Amazing.

Amin Ahmed:

So you answered my question without me asking it is when you have these big goals, how do you accomplish?

Amin Ahmed:

And so you're saying it's chunk by chunk, small.

Amin Ahmed:

just chip away at it every single day.

Amin Ahmed:

And that's where that becomes a habit of daily work on that one thing that you're trying to accomplish.

Joe Templin:

And if you have a plan that when you go through it is gonna reach it, that's great.

Joe Templin:

problem is if you've got a BHAG that is so huge, you don't know how you're gonna get it, that's when it's really exciting because you're like, How the hell am I gonna do this?

Joe Templin:

What new resources do I have?

Joe Templin:

What new thinking do I need?

Joe Templin:

Who do I need to talk to?

Joe Templin:

How am I gonna go about changing who and what I am to become worthy of achieving this?

Joe Templin:you wanna be CEO of a Fortune:Joe Templin:

What do you need be doing so that when you're 45, you're, in the vice presidential position, so that by the time you're in your early fifties, you're in the C-suite so that you can get into the CEO position.

Joe Templin:

What does it take?

Joe Templin:

What do you need to sacrifice?

Joe Templin:

What do you need to learn?

Joe Templin:

What sort of investments do you make?

Joe Templin:

What sort of, allies do you need to get?

Joe Templin:

What sort of mentors, who do you need to be mentoring all these things and.

Joe Templin:

. It basically involves reevaluating everything and saying, okay, I can't do this yet.

Joe Templin:

Let me figure out what I need to do that, and what I just said, I can't do this yet.

Joe Templin:

That's part of being able to harness the full power of your brain because when people say, I can't do this, that is literally embedding in the subconscious.

Joe Templin:

Nope.

Joe Templin:

Brick wall.

Joe Templin:

Versus, I can't do this yet.

Joe Templin:

When you have a subconscious, which is really the vast majority of your processing power coming into play saying, all right, there's a way to get on the other side, I'm gonna figure it out.

Joe Templin:

And so being able to harness that by simply adding yet.

Joe Templin:

On the end allows you to, even when I'm running a, 5K or if I'm down in the weight room, or if I'm playing with the kids doing something else, my subconscious is working on solving those problems to be able to get to set B-HAG.

Amin Ahmed:

I love that the idea of the subconscious and almost tapping into these other things you mentioned, exercise, power, nap, subconscious, using that when you're sleeping now, do you have any hacks or, I don't know.

Amin Ahmed:

I really don't like the word hacks.

Amin Ahmed:

Do you have any advice or productivity tips for when people get stuck

Joe Templin:

walk away from the situation.

Joe Templin:

This is one thing that scientists and, artists of all forms have.

Joe Templin:

For all human history, if you're stuck on a problem, put it aside person, Ursula, and and a bunch of others used to put their manuscript in a drawer and close and lock it and literally walk away.

Joe Templin:

There's so many scientists that would go in Einstein, what would he do?

Joe Templin:

He'd go for out and go on his sailboat and focus on that as opposed to working on the.

Joe Templin:

I go for a run and my old business partner used to make fun of me cause I'd literally run around the block.

Joe Templin:

I'd come back in, start writing on the whiteboard.

Joe Templin:

I'd go out and I'd run around the block maybe one or two more times.

Joe Templin:

I'd come in, I'd run on the whiteboard again, and I'd be able to go and run for my, actual run and come back in and immediately go to the whiteboard.

Joe Templin:

Because one of the things is that when you're working out a problem, you're figuring it out.

Joe Templin:

but the solution gets lost in the noise.

Joe Templin:

And so when you're engaged in something else that's not playing with a problem, whether it's listening to music, doing martial arts, running, meditating, playing with kids, leaving, what happens is that the neuroactivity around those connections actually reduces.

Joe Templin:

so those loosely connected neurons with the solution, you can actually hear it finally..

Joe Templin:

You can find the signal in the noise because you've damped down the noise overall.

Joe Templin:

So instead of focusing and you get yourself all anxious and revved up, slow down.

Joe Templin:

And so there's an old, Pennsylvania, Dutch saying, the hurrier I go, the slower I am.

Joe Templin:

Whereas they say in the military, slow is fast.

Joe Templin:

Fast is depth.

Amin Ahmed:

that's very cool.

Amin Ahmed:

I've had so many insights when I go out for a walk in nature, like I live in Canada and it gets pretty cold sometimes where we are.

Amin Ahmed:

And I remember last year I had a problem, couldn't figure it out, and I said, you know what?

Amin Ahmed:

I'm just gonna go out for a walk now.

Amin Ahmed:

It was minus 30 degrees Celsius, which is the same in Fahrenheit at that point.

Amin Ahmed:

And I was bundled up.

Amin Ahmed:

I even literally actually put on my ski goggles because when I, when it's that cold, your eyelashes freeze together.

Amin Ahmed:

I don't know if you've ever experienced that.

Amin Ahmed:

It's,

Joe Templin:

oh, yeah.

Joe Templin:

I'm near the Canadian border in upstate New York, so we get down to, basically minus 20 on a room.

Joe Templin:

every single year.

Joe Templin:

Yeah.

Joe Templin:

So I've been there doing that.

Amin Ahmed:

It's painful, but at the same time, you get a lot of insights just being out there in nature, and I think you're trying to stay warm at that point, or you're just focused on, walking.

Amin Ahmed:

. And those insights do come to you.

Amin Ahmed:

I love your analogy of how you get rid of the noise and then you can hear the signal in there.

Amin Ahmed:

on a side note, I'm learning with my daughter who's eight years old, how to DJ.

Amin Ahmed:

and we listen to electronic music and there's all these little knobs and turntables and the idea that you talk about where you turn down the signal, it's the same in DJing.

Amin Ahmed:

When you bring two songs together, it's the same key.

Amin Ahmed:

It's the same beat, but they're different songs.

Amin Ahmed:

And so you're actually dampening the high frequencies on one song as you increase the high frequency or the mids or the lows, and you bring it together and there's this harmony.

Joe Templin:

one of the things is that with harmony, you have two different waves, equations going, being the physics nerd, and what ends up is that you hit a harmonic on that, so you hit a higher order.

Joe Templin:

and you now create something new from it.

Joe Templin:

And so that is one of the things of having differential ideas, different things going on, is that it ends up can possibly creating synthetic knowledge from it where you've got these two or three different concepts coming together and producing something new off of it.

Amin Ahmed:

You said something about physics right now.

Amin Ahmed:

do you have a background in physics?

Amin Ahmed:

Yeah.

Joe Templin:

My background is, I was an applied physicist, so I say I'm a reformed physicist.

Joe Templin:

Yeah.

Joe Templin:

but I still approach the world very much from that sort of mindset because physics is all, what we did is we learned how to ask why.

Joe Templin:

Yeah.

Joe Templin:

My engineering friends, they all learned to ask how, but physics and philosophy in the oldest days were.

Joe Templin:

Trying to explain the universe.

Joe Templin:

So physics, philosophy, poetry, and psychology are all aspects of trying to explain the world and humankind's place in it.

Joe Templin:

And how we, interact.

Joe Templin:

They are all different components of trying to answer even the big question.

Amin Ahmed:

this is so cool because I have read so many books about psychology, about physics, cuz I'm an engineer, but also about, Spirituality as well.

Amin Ahmed:

Now there's so much overlap between those and it's rare to find somebody that can geek out about physics and spirituality, or if you wanna think about like physics and law of attraction, because some people think it doesn't exist, it's not there.

Amin Ahmed:

But if you go down to the quantum level and you start to look at things as energy waves rather than solid objects, physical objects, our brain thinks the same way.

Amin Ahmed:

So I'm curious to get your insight on how your thoughts influence your environment.

Joe Templin:

So if we wanna go on the more psychology end of things, we have what's called the reticular activation system, which is the filter on our software.

Joe Templin:

It is how we program ourselves to look at the world and we as humans have neuroplasticity.

Joe Templin:

Our brain will rewire itself and we can rewire it.

Joe Templin:

So we are coding our own machine along the way.

Joe Templin:

. That's something that people need to remember.

Joe Templin:

You can code it to be negative or you can code it to be positive.

Joe Templin:

Look for opportunities.

Joe Templin:

This is the reason why people who are serial entrepreneurs will build a company, sell it, go on out, stay on the beach for two days and then they, they'll have an idea because they see a problem and they go build another company to solve this, and they just keep doing this.

Joe Templin:

So people who are great.

Joe Templin:

poets do this.

Joe Templin:

They get inspiration from anything, whether it's this coffee cup or a, or an interaction with a pretty lady or what have you.

Joe Templin:

They take that and they turn that into verse as a way of explaining some of the concepts of the universe.

Joe Templin:

So we see the world not as it is, but as we are.

Joe Templin:

And so as we evolve and change and, alter what we're looking.

Joe Templin:

Then how we see the world alters too.

Joe Templin:

Back in the old days when we were wandering around, there were saber tooth tigers that we had to worry about eating us.

Joe Templin:

a wrestling lead was like, it's that danger.

Joe Templin:

And that's where our fight, our flight, response comes from in long ways and then involved because we notice different things.

Joe Templin:

Because of that.

Joe Templin:

So we can train our brain to be able to notice ideas or concepts.

Joe Templin:

So like I would use to, I used to train clients, Hey, this is person that I'm working for.

Joe Templin:

if you're a programmer, you notice a certain pattern like, oh, that's gonna not fit in the whole thing.

Joe Templin:

That's gonna be bug my friends who are intelligence officers, they can, they say that, they can spot a lie because there's a pattern and then there's a change in the pattern.

Joe Templin:

and so we program our brains in certain ways to notice certain things.

Joe Templin:

That's why people, as they get experienced in a position or a mindset, they become better and better with it.

Joe Templin:

You went to engineering school.

Joe Templin:

What was your brain like at 18 when you started, when you just had your sheer raw power versus what was it like as when you hit your senior year when you had learned how to think like an engineer?

Joe Templin:

what's it like down the road?

Amin Ahmed:

Yeah, absolutely.

Amin Ahmed:

And I always tell people that, I don't use the engineering principles I learned, but university taught me how to think and I can't articulate that other than saying before I went to university, I was basic in my thinking.

Amin Ahmed:

And when I left, I was able to formulate thoughts based on lots of inputs in a correct and accurate way.

Amin Ahmed:

I was able to accurately think, really, if you think about it, that.

Joe Templin:

And you're able to look at all these different components, find the relevant variables, and be able to build some form of model of any scenario, whether it's something simple where it's a linear thing of I pour the milk, it spills on the floor, okay, X equals y.

Joe Templin:

Make a change there.

Joe Templin:

Versus a multivariable thing where it's okay, I'm doing this for work and this for this work.

Joe Templin:

We gotta tweak this.

Joe Templin:

How's this gonna affect this output and all that.

Joe Templin:

That's just a higher level of thinking.

Joe Templin:

If you don't have that basis, you can't reach those higher levels worth of thinking.

Joe Templin:

A man can't stand, he can't fight, can't fly.

Amin Ahmed:

I've had so many conversations with people about, entrepreneurial success and business, but one thing that keeps coming back over and over again is that those that accomplish a lot often end up feeling quite empty at the end.

Amin Ahmed:

I hear the statement, often that, did I work this hard just to work this hard?

Amin Ahmed:

Or did I come this far just to go this far?

Amin Ahmed:

in your opinion, what defines happiness?

Joe Templin:

Ooh.

Joe Templin:

So in my opinion, happiness is, An output of what you're doing as opposed to the goal.

Joe Templin:

So if you're chasing the butterfly of happiness, you're never gonna catch it.

Joe Templin:

Cause you always need the bigger car, the prettier wife, the newer trip, you're, it's the hedonic treadmill, so it's always chasing something as opposed to, I believe it's more of loving the process.

Joe Templin:

So it's an infinite.

Joe Templin:

for example, as a martial artist, I'm never gonna be perfect.

Joe Templin:

I know this.

Joe Templin:

I've won titles, you can see one of my trophies back there and all this sort of stuff.

Joe Templin:

But it's a constant process of trying to improve, of trying to get better, of trying to understand more.

Joe Templin:

And as a scientist, the more you know, the more you don't know.

Joe Templin:

Because the area of our uncertainty on the edge of our knowledge continues to expand.

Joe Templin:

And so being comfortable with that and yet at the same time being fascinated and pushing and growing the same way that a little kid is exploring in the world, if you can maintain that, you're gonna be really happy with.

Joe Templin:

Are there frustrating months?

Joe Templin:

Absolutely.

Joe Templin:

Oh, this program's not working.

Joe Templin:

that thing did go out to the clients.

Joe Templin:

my kids spill stuff all over the place.

Joe Templin:

My ex-wife's did this.

Joe Templin:

my ankle's messed up so I can't run, but those go again.

Joe Templin:

If you have a strong enough why you can overcome it.

Joe Templin:

How, if those are all just, okay, this isn't just something else for us to figure out and get through in the overall process.

Joe Templin:

And then as Richard Frankl talked about in Search for Meaning, you know that moment when the rainbow is crossed the sky and you're like, and so if you're chasing happiness, it's always gonna be just beyond your grasp.

Joe Templin:

But if you're loving what you're doing, you're going to find that happiness actually is threaded through everything that you're doing.

Joe Templin:

, Amin Ahmed: have you always been this optimistic?

Joe Templin:

For the most part, yeah.

Joe Templin:

I mean I've had obviously had some, not great periods like during my divorce or recovering from injury or like when my mom was sick and dying from cancer.

Joe Templin:

Cause that stuff sucks But you have to basically embrace the Stockdale parallels, which as Jim Collins talks about, is life suck.

Joe Templin:

We can get through it.

Joe Templin:

It's a very Irish sort of thing.

Joe Templin:

you know what?

Joe Templin:

We might die tomorrow, but we'll be able to enjoy it.

Joe Templin:

It's not fatal.

Joe Templin:

It's fixable.

Joe Templin:

that chunk of code got deleted.

Joe Templin:

it's a chance to make it better.

Joe Templin:

Oh, I can't find this.

Joe Templin:

You know what?

Joe Templin:

We'll solve it.

Joe Templin:

Oh, the computer's not working quite right.

Joe Templin:

All right, so we'll do an audio call instead of a video call.

Joe Templin:

So it's having that resiliency in just being able to know, all right, doesn't matter.

Joe Templin:

We're gonna get through it.

Amin Ahmed:

has there been a moment, and feel free to share, as much or a few details, but has there been a moment in your life that happened where you made that realization that, okay, it is what it is.

Amin Ahmed:

Let's just move on

Joe Templin:

Yeah, so when I got married 20 years ago, We went away on our honeymoon for a couple of weeks, came on back and my ex-wife traveled for General Electric.

Joe Templin:

A lot.

Joe Templin:

A lot.

Joe Templin:

So we literally came on back and two days later she was back on the road.

Joe Templin:

This time she wasn't just going on the road, she was going all the way to Australia.

Joe Templin:

So she flew from upstate New York to Hawaii.

Joe Templin:

Stayed with my sister for a day, then flew down to Australia, and she was there for two and a half.

Joe Templin:

During that time, I'm newlywed.

Joe Templin:

I'm home, I'm studying for exams, and I ended up having, because of law damage that I had accumulated over time with martial arts and all that.

Joe Templin:

I ended up having this as gross, a, testicular contortion and basically spun around and choked itself off and died.

Joe Templin:

I had to drive myself to the hospital to have surgery.

Joe Templin:

And when I woke up the next day and they're talking to me, they basically told me I had a choice between having kids or my dream of fighting in the Olympics.

Joe Templin:

And so at that point it's no.

Joe Templin:

All right, there's no real choice.

Joe Templin:

And I've got three kids, my hooligans and I sometimes, when they're really under my skin, it's you know what?

Joe Templin:

I could trade you for a gold medal

Amin Ahmed:

that's, thank you for sharing that with us.

Amin Ahmed:

That takes a lot.

Amin Ahmed:

And when you have to make those kinds of decisions, and I hope most people don't have to make big decisions like that, but inevitably

Joe Templin:

everybody's gonna have to make decisions like that.

Joe Templin:

So you the, as Walt Disney said, decades and decades ago, when values are clear, decisions are easy.

Joe Templin:

. So my goal would always to be, been to be a great fund.

Joe Templin:

Okay.

Joe Templin:

And yeah, it's spent, decade, more than a decade, training and, moving up the ranks and everything to be able to pursue that Olympic dream.

Joe Templin:

Having the kids was more important, so it because they were not close in terms of the value, because being a good father was so much more important to me.

Joe Templin:

I just made that decision.

Joe Templin:

And so a lot of the other things I've had to do, I have two special needs kids.

Joe Templin:

My oldest and my youngest.

Joe Templin:

Are both on the autism spectrum.

Joe Templin:

My youngest is adhd, my oldest is bipolar, so I've had to deal with all these sort of things for roughly the past 13 years on top of everything else.

Joe Templin:

And so I literally, my goal be a good dad.

Joe Templin:

Who before, COVID hit and everything and divorce my life was get up at four o'clock in the morning.

Joe Templin:

I wasn't training at that point.

Joe Templin:

Really.

Joe Templin:

I could get 15 minutes of training in, cause I had to work until I had to get the first kids up, get 'em off to school, then get the second one up because they were on different school schedules and so 8:40 he'd get on the.

Joe Templin:

I could start working, then I'd have to be done with work by 2:45 when the kids got home.

Joe Templin:

I'd be in full bed mode from then until 8:30 when they went to bed.

Joe Templin:

I had to have kids three different places every single day, plus make the food, supervise the homework and all that.

Joe Templin:

Cause my wife was traveling everywhere at that point.

Joe Templin:

And then I could get back the work mode.

Joe Templin:

So I'd work from 8:30 till midnight to get at four o'clock in the morning to repeat.

Joe Templin:

Why did I do that?

Joe Templin:

Because what was the most important thing?

Joe Templin:

Being a good dad, being a successful business owner was important, but not quite as important.

Joe Templin:

So I did what I had to do for that because that's where my priorities lie.

Joe Templin:

At that point.

Joe Templin:

Now your priorities will shift.

Joe Templin:

My kids are now older, so they don't need me quite as much and all that, so I can work more.

Joe Templin:

I've got the opportunity to be more flexible with things.

Joe Templin:

So you do the best that you can at that point with the overall goals in mind.

Amin Ahmed:

Yeah.

Amin Ahmed:

do the best that you can with what you have at the time.

Amin Ahmed:

I love that.

Amin Ahmed:

Yep.

Amin Ahmed:

Is there anything that your friends or people that know you would be something fun that they would be genuinely surprised to learn about you?

Joe Templin:

Oh, they know him pretty crazy.

Joe Templin:

people who just know me a little.

Joe Templin:

Actually don't realize that even though I'm like a badass martial artist, I come across really tough in all that in a lot of ways, and I'm, this big nerdy dork and all that.

Joe Templin:

I've got this love for poetry.

Joe Templin:

and writing and all that.

Joe Templin:

So whether it's music and I can't sing, so go and ask me to, but I appreciate music, I appreciate art.

Joe Templin:

Even though I can't draw a straight line without a ruler, I actually can write in some capacity.

Joe Templin:

So that's stuff that I enjoy.

Joe Templin:

And so it's one of these things that helps create that balance overall.

Amin Ahmed:

That's pretty cool.

Amin Ahmed:

I got a little bit of that when you mentioned Black Sabbath that the suit and tie Black Sabbath.

Amin Ahmed:

There was probably a different angle to this here as well.

Joe Templin:

So one of the things is that we are all really like diamonds.

Joe Templin:

and we have all these different facets.

Joe Templin:

And one of the things that you find out over time when as you get to know somebody better, is you can look at 'em from different perspectives.

Joe Templin:

, so you can see different aspects of them as a person.

Joe Templin:

And one of the things that we should be doing is making sure that we all have our flaws, we all have faults.

Joe Templin:

None of us are perfect, but we need to work on polishing those different aspects of ourselves.

Joe Templin:

To be able to present the full beauty, the full, jewel to the universe, and all too often people are just working on one or two of those faces as opposed to trying to work on many of them, which makes you that much better and makes you that much more brilliant and valuable.

Amin Ahmed:

That's a great analogy.

Amin Ahmed:

All of these little tidbits that you're giving here, I'm in my marketer's brain is thinking, man, that would make a really good blog post.

Amin Ahmed:

That would make a really good social media.

Joe Templin:

Go ahead and steal 'em.

Joe Templin:

Write 'em.

Joe Templin:

Write 'em off.

Amin Ahmed:

That's awesome.

Amin Ahmed:

I love your energy.

Amin Ahmed:

It's really fun.

Amin Ahmed:

And what's got you fired up right now that you're working on?

Joe Templin:

So what's got me fired up is I'm a man on mission and my mission is to reach and positively impact a hundred million.

Joe Templin:

By my birthday, which is in July.

Joe Templin:

So the goal, our deadline is just a dream.

Joe Templin:

I've got, the goal and I've got the deadline up.

Joe Templin:

Reach a hundred million people and positively impact them in some capacity during that time period.

Joe Templin:

Cause life sucks at times.

Joe Templin:

And we've had covid, we've got war, we've got recessions going on.

Joe Templin:

There's all this uncertainty.

Joe Templin:

People, are facing difficulty.

Joe Templin:

There's all these negative pressures.

Joe Templin:

So if I can, through my writing, through being on, discussions like this with you, Amin, radio programs, people buy my books, coaching, whatever, be able to reach out and positively impact a hundred million people, then what that does is that creates a hundred million little nodes of positivity.

Joe Templin:

And we all know about the butterfly flatnet swings and creating a hurricane someplace else in the world.

Joe Templin:

Or if we create a hundred million positive.

Joe Templin:

Of goodness, of positivity, of people helping other individuals out.

Joe Templin:

If we could do that, then we can literally bend the curve of what's going on in societies today and make the world a much better place.

Joe Templin:

And it's not through these huge movements, as Gandalf says, it's through the quiet actions of everyday people.

Joe Templin:

So the little things, so one of the things I want your listeners to do, go smile at five people.

Joe Templin:

The reason why is when you smile, it decreases the cortisol in your own system.

Joe Templin:

And it increases your dopamine, makes you happier, makes you slightly more intelligent.

Joe Templin:

But because of mirror neurons in the brain, what happens is if I smile at you or if I laugh and get you to laugh, then suddenly you've gotten that gift also, you're healthier, you're happier because of something that I did, and it cost me nothing other than a couple of seconds.

Joe Templin:

And if it's going something that's just happening in the normal course of affairs, it's not even costing me part of my life.

Joe Templin:

It's additive because when you laugh.

Joe Templin:

You slow down the aging process, so every time you laugh, you basically add on that much time to your life.

Joe Templin:

And so I've helped give you that gift.

Joe Templin:

And if you can now give that gift to half dozen other people, what's that gonna do?

Joe Templin:

I don't know.

Joe Templin:

We can't necessarily measure it, but we can feel it.

Amin Ahmed:

Awesome.

Amin Ahmed:

That's awesome.

Amin Ahmed:

That's a perfect note to end off on and those that are listening to the episode, I hope you can hear the smiles in our face when we're talking about this as well.

Amin Ahmed:

if somebody wanted to learn more about you and the amazing work you're doing, where can they find you?

Joe Templin:

maybe in the pub, but actually the best place to find me is if they go to my website, everyday-excellence.com.

Joe Templin:

That's everyday-excellence.com.

Joe Templin:

Every single day I put up a new blog post the podcast live there so they can find this one, a whole bunch of other ones.

Joe Templin:

There's gonna be links to the YouTube channel and TikTok.

Joe Templin:

So there's just all these resources there.

Joe Templin:

For people to be able to help themselves out, and I recently launched a 28 day coaching program where every single day it's a little bit of reinforcement and guidance and some accountability around it to make sure that you're growing and developing, and people who are going through that program are doing things like.

Joe Templin:

Giving up smoking and finishing projects that they had put on the shelf for six months or a year and spending a little bit more time with their kids and working out a little bit more.

Joe Templin:

So it's micro improvements that ultimately help change the curve of their life to a much better place.

Amin Ahmed:

Oh, that's awesome.

Amin Ahmed:

And that's a free program on your website, everyday-excellence.com.

Joe Templin:

That one is a paid one, but the three day one is completely free.

Joe Templin:

So there's hundreds of free resources there.

Joe Templin:

So paid ones that buys my beer.

Joe Templin:

I like my beer, obviously, I'm Irish, but there's all sorts of free ones.

Joe Templin:

Use whatever works for you.

Joe Templin:

This is all part of helping people out.

Amin Ahmed:

That's awesome.

Amin Ahmed:

I'll put those links down into the show notes for anybody listening.

Amin Ahmed:

Joe, I really appreciate your time today, your energy, your attention in what we've been talking about.

Amin Ahmed:

It's been really fun.

Amin Ahmed:

Thank you so much.

Amin Ahmed:

I really, I'm really grateful for having you on the show today,

Joe Templin:

Amin.

Joe Templin:

Thank you.

Joe Templin:

Be excellent and grow today.